12 Best Backpacking Tents for Tall People in 2022

By Joshua Davis •  Updated: 09/08/22 •  26 min read

Every time I take my family on a camping or backpacking trip, they see Big Foot.

It’s me.

At 6’4″ and 210 pounds, I’m not your average backpacker. I’m also not as agile as I used to be; so, when it comes to finding a tent that provides adequate wiggle room without stacking on the weight, I have to do my homework.

Like when I need a new set of hiking britches that don’t give the impression that I shop at the Baby GAP.

Being a tall person, I’ve had to do some digging for myself and, if it saves you some work, I’d like to share the results with you.

Here are the best backpacking tents for tall people that I’ve found for my upcoming trips in 2022 and 2023.

OFHQ’s Favorites

Even the tall backpackers can run short on time. If that’s you and you need some tall-suited best tents pronto, check out our favorite backpacking tents for tall people, below.

1. ZPacks Triplex

You’re gonna pay for this. But, you’re also gonna love it.

The ZPacks Triplex is, hands down, the best of the best ultralight tents for tall people that money can buy unless of course, you prefer its little bro’, the Duplex (see below).

At a whisper-weight of 21.6 ounces and 100 inches long, the Triplex offers best-in-class livability for those of us who are vertically gifted.

If you don’t mind spending a little extra and want the best backpacking tent that money can buy, go with the Triplex.

Do I own it? No. I’m a middle-class father of two and a struggling content creator for an up-start outdoorsy website.

So, I write Santa Claus and dream about it.

But, when I arrive, I WILL buy this. Shoot, I’ll buy one for everyone in my family too if all goes as planned!

Best High End Backpacking Tent
ZPacks Triplex
Pros:
  • Multiple Award-Winner
  • It's lighter than most 1-person tents
  • Dual entries and vestibules provide lots of room to maneuver and store gear
  • Chemical-free waterproof fabric with taped seams
  • Dyneema fabric possesses a high strength-to-weight ratio
  • Included Dyneema repair tape makes repairs painless
  • Huge inner tent dimensions
  • Excellent ventilation
  • 2-year warranty
Cons:
  • Your wallet's gonna scream ...
  • Stakes and ground sheet not included
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2. ZPacks Duplex

The little bro’ to the Triplex, the ZPacks Duplex, is top-shelf for those who need to shed some grams … oh, I mean ounces. Sorry, y’all.

This backpacking tent for tall people hovers above the scales at a mere 18.5 ounces. That’s impressive!

And with 100 inches of interior length, it’s just as long as the Triplex.

It’s also pretty pricey; so, if you’re working with a limited budget, you may want to start a GoFundMe or trim down the beer fund.

But, if you’re looking for the best ultralight backpacking tent on the market, this is it (or it’s bigger bro’).

Best Ultralight
Duplex Tent - 2P UL Backpacking Shelter | Zpacks
Pros:
  • Multiple Award-Winner
  • Chemical-free waterproof fabric with taped seams
  • Dyneema fabric possesses a high strength-to-weight ratio
  • Included Dyneema repair tape makes repairs painless
  • LOTS of stretch-out room in the length
  • Excellent ventilation
  • 2-year warranty
Cons:
  • Stakes sold separately
  • Staggering price point
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3. REI Co-Op TrailHut 4

It’s 90 inches long. Almost as wide. And it’s a whopping 122 ounces.

It’s also at a price point that won’t make your wallet tuck its tail and run.

The REI Co-op TrailHut 4 is a great option for those who want a little more space without having to remortgage their home.

Divvy-ing up the parts of this tent among your fellow backpackers will put the weight-to-backpacker ratio right within the lightweight category, even if there are just two of you.

And even two Yeti-sized humans in this tent will have plenty of room to sleep, move around, and do some light yoga without knocking elbows.

Best BIGGEST Backpacking Tent
REI Co-op Trail Hut 4
Pros:
  • No-regret price tag
  • Great family backpacking tall tent
  • Complete package with everything you need
  • Dual entries and vestibules for easy ins and outs and storage
  • Fly doors pitch out to create awnings
  • Plenty of internal gear pockets and loops
  • Domed architecture provides more headroom throughout
  • 1-year warranty (for REI members; 90-days if not)
Cons:
  • Too bulky and heavy if backpacking alone
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4. ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2

Take the 86 ounces, divvy the poles and fabric up among trail mates and save some cash.

And then enjoy palatial spaciousness at camp. A 96″ x 60″ floor provides plenty of room for two leviathan-grade humans (on an intimate level) and perhaps even a furry friend (provided it’s not a grizzly).

Or, for the price, buy two and get a little more of a workout along the trail and a bit more me-space at day’s end.

Best Budget Backpacking Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2 Tent | REI Outlet
Pros:
  • Dual entry and vestibules provide easy entry/exit and convenient gear storage
  • A good budget alternative to expensive high-end tents
  • Factory sealed fly and seams
  • 1-year warranty
Cons:
  • Groundsheet sold separately
  • Only one overhead gear pocket
  • Very heavy for a 2-person backpacking tent
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The Line Up: Best Backpacking Tent for Tall People

In terms of being tall, I’m a ‘tweener. I’m in that place between short-tall people (6 feet) and tall-tall people (6’5″ and up).

As such, I feel like I’ve got a pretty good grasp on what works and what doesn’t when it comes to finding the best backpacking tent for most taller-than-average humanoids.

That being said, the best backpacking tent for tall people should be at least 90 inches long and 42″ wide to sleep a solo Sasquatch comfortably. This is my not-so-humble opinion from experience.

I’ve isolated the following tents based on these criteria in conjunction with their weight (always a tradeoff), quality of construction, and other useful features.

Keep reading if you want the full skinny or, if you’re short on time, use the QUICK LINKS above to jump ahead to whichever section ruffles your truffles.

1. MSR Hubba Hubba

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 46

Interior Dimensions (in): 84L x 50W x 40H

Available Capacities: 1, 2 (reviewed), and 3-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 20D Ripstop Nylon / 20D Ripstop Nylon 1200mm Polyurethane

As suggested by the moniker, the MSR Hubba Hubba is a snug 2-person backpacker, especially if you bring along a friend of sasquatch proportions.

Thanks to its sub-3-pound weight, robust construction, and ability to withstand everything from light rain to full-on thunderstorms, this 3-season tent makes a reliable shelter for the average excursion in mild conditions.

The tent body is made from waterproof, abrasion-resistant ripstop nylon and the floor has a water-resistant coating. The seams are taped, as well, to further keep the wet stuff out.

MSR Hubba Hubba 2-Person Backpacking Tent
$479.95 $449.95
Pros:
  • Rainfly with 15 sq. ft. vestibule included
  • Waterproof DuraShield coating and taped seams
  • Hub-and-pole design makes for a fast setup
  • 3-year warranty
Cons:
  • Center height and length are significantly shorter than most other tents in this post
  • A bit snug for two
  • Price ... ouch.
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10/01/2022 11:34 am GMT

When it comes to living quarters, the Hubba Hubba is best described as cozy. At 7 feet long and a smidge over 4 feet wide, it’s respectably spacious but by no means palatial. And, the 38-inch center height will have those with longer spines brushing up against the ceiling.

That being said, it’s a great choice for those who are looking for an ultralight backpacking tent for a tall person that will hold up in serious weather conditions.

The best feature of the Hubba Hubba, though, is its weight (or lack thereof). At just 2 pounds and change, it’s one of the lighter 2-person tents on the market.

For those who need a little more space or are looking for a tent that’s a bit easier on the 6-foot-and-up set, check out the next option.

2. Six Moons Design Lunar Solo

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 26

Interior Dimensions (in): 90L x 48W x 48H

Available Capacities: 1 (reviewed) and 2-person tent

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 20D Silicone-Coated Polyester / 40D Silicone-Coated 3000mm Polyester

The Lunar Solo by Six Moons Design addresses the problem of ventilation when it comes to shelter against wind and rain.

The award-winning, unique design resembles a basic tarp-and-pole shelter while incorporating a tubbed floor to keep out rain-off during heavy rain.

The floating canopy allows the camper to adjust the height and, at the same time, adjust the amount of ventilation passing underneath the canopy.

Six Moons Design Lunar Solo
$250.00
Pros:
  • Multiple Award-Winner
  • Reasonably priced
  • Excellent ventilation
  • The floating canopy can be adjusted for height
  • Great head and stretch-out room
  • Adequately-sized vestibule (8 sq. ft.)
Cons:
  • Seams will need to be sealed on receipt
  • Stakes sold separately
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10/01/2022 11:34 am GMT

The thoughtful design provides a surprising amount of elbow, head, and stretch-out room for a solo, ultralight tent.

There are some drawbacks, however. The Lunar Solo arrives without any means of securing it to the ground and stakes must be purchased separately.

In addition, the seams will need to be sealed with silicone or another waterproofing agent in order to keep the water out during a downpour.

Still, for those in search of an ultralight, single-person tent that’s easy on the wallet and won’t leave you feeling claustrophobic, the Lunar Solo is a smart buy.

3. ZPacks Duplex

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 18.5

Interior Dimensions (in): 100L x 45W x 48H

Available Capacities: 1-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Dyneema Composite Fabric / 40D Silicone-Coated 3000mm Polyester

A highly-popular tent among Appalachian Trail thru-hikers, the Duplex from ZPacks is one of the best (if not THE best) ultralight shelters on the market.

Made with Dyneema composite fabric, which is 5 times stronger than Kevlar and has a higher strength-to-weight ratio, the Duplex weighs in at just 18.5 ounces.

Best Ultralight
Duplex Tent - 2P UL Backpacking Shelter | Zpacks
Pros:
  • Multiple Award-Winner
  • Chemical-free waterproof fabric with taped seams
  • Dyneema fabric possesses a high strength-to-weight ratio
  • Included Dyneema repair tape makes repairs painless
  • LOTS of stretch-out room in the length
  • Excellent ventilation
  • 2-year warranty
Cons:
  • Stakes sold separately
  • Staggering price point
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The 8-inch tall tub floor is made of the same material as the canopy, but with twice the thickness.

The seams are sealed with Dyneema tape, making this one of the most water-resistant tents available.

The thoughtful design of the sloped walls, tub floor, and mesh in between ensures that any condensation on the inside of the tent runs through the mesh to the outside, not on the tent floor.

The Duplex is also extremely easy to set up and take down. The entire shelter can be packed up and stowed away in its stuff sack, which measures just 12L x 5.5W x 5H inches.

The only drawback to this otherwise perfect tent is the price tag. Still, if the expected life span is 2500+ miles, then it can handle a thru-hike on the AT (and then some) or years of general use.

For those who are looking for the best of the best when it comes to an ultralight backpacking shelter, the Duplex from ZPacks is hard to beat.

4. NEMO Dagger OSMO 2

Type: Lightweight 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 54

Interior Dimensions (in): 90L x 50W x 42H

Available Capacities: 2 (reviewed) and 3-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Nylon Ripstop and No-See-Um Mesh / 0D OSMO 2000 mm Ripstop

It’s rare to find a backpacking gear company that is willing to bind itself to its customers for the life of their purchase.

NEMO does just that with their Dagger two-person tent, making it one of the great choices among the best tents for tall peeps.

For those unfamiliar with NEMO, they are a premium gear company that designs and manufactures all of its products in the USA.

The Dagger 2P is, in our regard among the best lightweight tents that sleep two people. It has a minimum weight of 54 ounces, making it a solid candidate for the lightweight category of backpacking tents.

NEMO Dagger OSMO 2
Pros:
  • Lifetime warranty
  • Generous width provides lots of maneuvering room
  • Chemical-free waterproof fabric
  • Rainfly provides a vestibule over both doors with tubbed ground sheets for dry gear storage
  • Two doors make for easy entry and exit when sleeping two people
  • Divvy sack allows two backpackers to split the weight when packed
Cons:
  • A bit short on headroom
  • Not quite ultralight
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The Dagger 2P is made with double-wall construction, which means that there is a waterproof canopy and a separate rainfly. The rainfly provides a vestibule over each door, which is extremely helpful for storing gear and keeping it dry.

Both the canopy and the rainfly are made with a chemical-free waterproof 100% recycled fabric, which is a nice touch. The floor is made with 0D OSMO 2000mm Ripstop, which is a bit heavier but will hold up better to repeated use.

The Dagger 2P also has two doors, which is helpful when sleeping two people. The Divvy sack, an innovative touch, allows two backpackers to split the weight of the tent materials when packed.

The only drawbacks of the Dagger 2P are that it is a bit short on headroom and that it is not quite ultralight. However, for those who are looking for a high-quality, innovative, American-made tent from an environmentally responsible company, the Dagger 2P is worth a gander.

5. REI Co-Op Half Dome SL 2

Type: Lightweight 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 63

Interior Dimensions (in): 90L x 54W x 42H

Available Capacities: 2-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 40D Ripstop Nylon / 40D Taffeta Nylon

A complete backpacking tent package leaving nothing out, the REI Co-op Half Dome SL2 comes with a footprint included. This is the first thing that caught my eye when reviewing this tent.

While some people may not use a footprint, I think it’s an essential piece of gear, especially for ultralight backpackers who want to extend the life of their tent floor.

The Half Dome SL2 is also a full 9″ wider than other tents in this review, which is a huge plus for tall people who want some extra elbow room (’cause tall-people elbows are killers).

REI Co-Op Half Dome SL 2
Pros:
  • Footprint included
  • A full 9" wider than others in this review
  • 2 doors make entry and exit easy with two people
  • 2 vestibules provide lots of gear storage
  • Hubbed pole assembly makes for quick deployment
  • 1-year warranty (for REI members; 90-days if not)
Cons:
  • A "heavier" lightweight tent
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As with the Dagger 2P, the Half Dome SL2 has two doors and two vestibules. This makes entry and exit easy with two people, and provides lots of gear storage. The Half Dome SL2 also has a hub-and-pole assembly, which makes for quick deployment.

The only drawback of the Half Dome SL2 is that it is a bit on the heavy side for a “lightweight” tent. However, given all of the features and benefits that this tent offers, the extra weight is worth it.

REI also offers a 1-year warranty on the Half Dome SL2 (for REI members; 90-days if not). This is a nice touch and adds an extra level of confidence for those who are looking to purchase this tent.

6. Six Moons Design Lunar Duo Explorer

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 45

Interior Dimensions (in): 90L x 54W x 45H

Available Capacities: 1 and 2-person (reviewed)

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 30D silicone-coated nylon /30D silicone-coated 3000mm nylon

Pros:

Cons:

Affectionately referred to as The Backcountry Palace, the Lunar Duo Explorer from Six Moons Design is an ultralight backpacking tent that doesn’t skimp on features.

The Lunar Duo Explorer has dual vestibules, which provide ample gear storage. The dual entry makes ins and outs easier, and the floating canopy allows for height adjustment.

And it’s SPACIOUS! In good or bad weather, whether playing a game of cards or turning in for the night, the Lunar Duo Explorer has enough room for two large-ish people and their gear.

Six Moons Design Lunar Duo Explorer
$200.00
Pros:
  • Dual vestibules provide ample gear storage
  • Dual entry makes ins and outs easier
  • The floating canopy allows for height adjustment
  • Super-fast dual-pole setup
  • Refreshing price
Cons:
  • Seams will need to be sealed on receipt
  • Stakes sold separately
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10/02/2022 01:39 am GMT

The best part of the Lunar Duo Explorer, though, is the super-fast dual-pole setup. Stake your corners, position a trekking pole at each end, and tension your guylines. Done!

The only drawbacks of the Lunar Duo Explorer are that the seams will need to be sealed on receipt and that the stakes are sold separately.

However, given the wealth of features and benefits that this ultralight backpacking tent offers, these are minor quibbles.

7. ZPacks Triplex

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 21.6

Interior Dimensions (in): 100L x 60W x 48H

Available Capacities: 1-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Dyneema Composite Fabric / 40D Silicone-Coated 3000mm Polyester

One of the countless glowing reviews I read about the Triplex is that it’s spacious enough to “sleep three large men comfortably.”

I don’t know about you, but …

… on a backpacking trip, I ain’t snuggling up to anyone as big (or bigger) than my own smelly keister; but, to each his own.

Also, I’m not a Rockefeller; so, dropping this much green on a shelter would mean obliterating my beer fund for half the year.

Still, it’s a freakin’ awesome backpacking tent!

Best High End Backpacking Tent
ZPacks Triplex
Pros:
  • Multiple Award-Winner
  • It's lighter than most 1-person tents
  • Dual entries and vestibules provide lots of room to maneuver and store gear
  • Chemical-free waterproof fabric with taped seams
  • Dyneema fabric possesses a high strength-to-weight ratio
  • Included Dyneema repair tape makes repairs painless
  • Huge inner tent dimensions
  • Excellent ventilation
  • 2-year warranty
Cons:
  • Your wallet's gonna scream ...
  • Stakes and ground sheet not included
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The Triplex from ZPacks is an ultralight backpacking tent that has won multiple awards. It’s actually lighter than most 1-person tents and its unique triangular shape optimizes interior space.

The Triplex has dual entries and vestibules, which provide lots of room to maneuver and store gear.

The chemical-free waterproof fabric with taped seams and the included Dyneema repair tape make this tent virtually indestructible … until it breaks … then, you can make it indestructible again.

The best part of the Triplex, though, is the amount of stretch-out room in the length. At 100 inches long, I can finally sleep comfortably in a backpacking tent (if I could find a rich friend who will let me borrow theirs, that is).

The only drawbacks of the Triplex are that stakes and groundsheet are not included and that it’s pricey … pricey enough that one would think they could comp a few extras.

Fortunately, the 2-year warranty offers some peace of mind for this significant investment.

If you’re looking for an ultralight backpacking tent that is spacious, well-ventilated, and built to last, then the Triplex from ZPacks is one worth saving up for.

8. Big Agnes Copper Spur 3

Type: Lightweight 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 57

Interior Dimensions (in): 96L x 70W x 47H

Available Capacities: 2 and 3-person (reviewed)

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Ultralight double ripstop mixed denier nylon / same material silicone treated

We’re a Big Agnes family and have been for over a decade.

Because they care about tall people!

The Copper Spur 3 is a freestanding tent that weighs in at just over 2 pounds. It’s made with ultralight double ripstop mixed denier nylon and can be set up in under 5 minutes (even by myself, who, admittedly, is not exactly known for having a sense of urgency when it comes to setting up camp).

Big Agnes Copper Spur 3
Pros:
  • Dual entry makes for easy ins and outs
  • Dual vestibules convert into open-air awnings when supported by trekking poles
  • Rainfly and groundsheet can be set up without the tent for a lighter-weight shelter
  • Lots of interior gear storage
  • The domed shape provides stability in high winds (as opposed to a straight-wall or cabin tent)
  • Full mesh roof provides open view of night sky in fair weather
Cons:
  • Pricey!
  • Groundsheet sold separately
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The best part of the Copper Spur 3, though, is the amount of livable space. At 96 inches long and 70 inches wide, providing almost 48 square feet of floor space, there is plenty of room for three tall people to sleep comfortably … kind of …

… even better when it’s just you and one of your less-gargantuan family members.

There are also two vestibules (one on each side) that can be converted into open-air awnings when supported by trekking poles.

The rainfly and groundsheet (sold separately … boo) can be set up without the tent for a lighter-weight shelter, which is great if you’re planning on doing some fair-weather hiking.

The only downside of the Copper Spur 3 is the price tag. But, when you compare it to other backpacking tents of its rapport, it’s actually not that bad.

9. REI Co-Op TrailHut 4

Type: Heavy 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 112

Interior Dimensions (in): 90L x 88W x 48H

Available Capacities: 4-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Polyester / polyester

How heavy is “too heavy” for a backpacking tent? Hmmm …

That’s a tough one. But, if you’re planning on packing this sucker into the backcountry by yourself, I’m going to recommend renting a pack horse or a chopper-drop.

Right at 7 pounds, the REI Co-Op TrailHut 4 is best suited for backpacking with a group that can help with weight distribution. If you’re packing this tent, you’ll want to split up the canopy, poles, and fly/groundsheet into separate packs.

But, if you don’t mind the extra weight, the TrailHut 4 is a backcountry Taj Mahal for tall people …

… would that make it a Tall Mahal?

Best BIGGEST Backpacking Tent
REI Co-op Trail Hut 4
Pros:
  • No-regret price tag
  • Great family backpacking tall tent
  • Complete package with everything you need
  • Dual entries and vestibules for easy ins and outs and storage
  • Fly doors pitch out to create awnings
  • Plenty of internal gear pockets and loops
  • Domed architecture provides more headroom throughout
  • 1-year warranty (for REI members; 90-days if not)
Cons:
  • Too bulky and heavy if backpacking alone
Buy Now on REI Co-Op
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At 90 inches long and 88 inches wide, it’s one of the biggest four-person backpacking tents out there. And, with a 48-inch peak height, there’s plenty of room to move around (and even kneel) inside the tent.

The TrailHut 4 also comes with two doors and vestibules, so you can easily get in and out without having to climb over your tent mates. And, the fly doors pitch out to create awnings, which is nice if you want to enjoy some fresh air without getting eaten alive by mosquitos.

Finally, there are plenty of internal gear pockets and loops to keep your things organized.

Now, to convince REI to change the name to Tall Mahal

10. ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2

Type: A Tad Heavy 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 86

Interior Dimensions (in): 96L x 60W x 48H

Available Capacities: 2-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 75D 185T Polyester Fly / 75D 185T 3000mm poly-taffeta

If your priorities when tent-hunting tilt in favor of saving dollars over ounces, then the ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2 might be your new trail shack.

At around $200, it’s one of the most affordable tents on this list. But, don’t let the low price tag fool you…

The Mystique 2 is a pretty darn solid tent.

Best Budget Backpacking Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Mystique 2 Tent | REI Outlet
Pros:
  • Dual entry and vestibules provide easy entry/exit and convenient gear storage
  • A good budget alternative to expensive high-end tents
  • Factory sealed fly and seams
  • 1-year warranty
Cons:
  • Groundsheet sold separately
  • Only one overhead gear pocket
  • Very heavy for a 2-person backpacking tent
Buy Now on REI Co-Op
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

It comes with two doors and vestibules, so you can get in and out without disturbing your tent mate. The fly is also factory sealed to keep water out, and the seams are all taped … no need for you to do it yourself … until you need to do it again … later on.

The Mystique 2 also has a pretty decent interior height of 48 inches. Not as tall as some of the other tents on this list, but plenty high enough for a tall drink of water like myself.

However, one downside of the Mystique 2 is that it only has one overhead gear pocket. So, if you’re the type that likes to keep your tent tidy, you might have to get creative with how you store your things.

Finally, at around 7 pounds, the Mystique 2 is on the heavy side for a 2-person backpacking tent. But, considering the price and features, it’s still a great option for budget-minded tall campers.

11. Lightheart Gear SoLong 6 Sil-Nylon

Type: Ultralight 3-Season Non-Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz): 32

Interior Dimensions (in): 100L x 55W x 45H

Available Capacities: 2-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): Waterproof 3500mm nylon / Silicone-impregnated ripstop nylon (sil-nylon)

The SoLong 6 by Lightheart Gear is a no-frills (and no extras) backpacking trekking pole tent with its trophy feature being a monstrous amount of lay-down room.

At 100 inches long and 55 inches wide, the SoLong can easily accommodate two 6-foot-plus campers. And, with a 45-inch peak height, you won’t have to worry about hitting your head on the ceiling when you sit up.

Lightheart Gear SoLong 6 Sil-Nylon
Pros:
  • Dual door and vestibules provide easy access and gear storage
  • Super-spacious interior
  • Ultralight tent poles can be ordered en lieu of using trekking poles
Cons:
  • Seam sealing, stakes, and awning pole are all sold separately
  • The involved setup process requires more time and effort than ... well, anything I've seen in a backpacking tent
  • Only 1 gear pocket
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The SoLong also has a decently sized gear loft that’s great for storing things like your headlamp, glasses, or pet gerbil.

However, one downside is that there are no internal gear pockets … so you might have to get creative with how you organize your stuff.

Another potential issue is that the SoLong doesn’t come with a footprint, so you’ll have to buy one separately or make your own (Tyvek scraps, baby!)

The SoLong’s biggest drawback: pitching the thing. For a price tag like this, not only should stakes and seam-sealing be thrown in, but a more streamlined setup is expected.

12. TETON Mountain Ultra 3

Type: Heavy 3-Season Freestanding

Minimum Weight (oz):135

Interior Dimensions (in):88L x 75W x 49H Available

Capacities: 1, 2, 3 (reviewed), or 4-person

Fabric (Canopy/Floor): 150D Polyester Oxford / 150D Polyester Oxford

The tradeoff between price, space, and weight couldn’t be more evident in TETON’s Mountain Ultra lineup of tents.

The 3-person version tips the scales at a whopping 135 ounces … a staggering 21 ounces more than REI’s Half Dome 4!

TETON Sports Mountain Ultra 3-Person Tent
Pros:
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Dual entry/exit
  • Internal pockets, loft, and dual vestibules provide ample gear storage
  • Duel entry/exit means you don't have to climb over others to get in/out
  • Quick setup
  • All seams, corners, and anchor points come factory sealed
Cons:
  • Polyester Oxford has a lower strength-to-weight ratio than nylon
  • Footprint sold separately
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The elephant in the tent is due to the lower-cost polyester oxford used in its construction. While plenty waterproof and resilient in its own right, it simply does not equal nylon when it comes to its strength-to-weight ratio.

It’s a heavier material that is more susceptible to stretching and tearing if handled roughly. So, be gentle!

A little packing creativity, however, can resolve the issue of weight: split the poles and fabric between backpackers and you’re good to go.

If you’re backpacking solo, rent a mule.

The Mountain Ultra 3 is a spacious tent with plenty of room to move around. At 88 x 75 inches, the floor area is on par with other 3-person tents … but the 49-inch peak height gives you some much-needed extra headroom.

There are also two doors and vestibules, which come in handy when you need to get in and out without disturbing your tent-mates.

The best part: all seams, corners, and anchor points come factory sealed … so you don’t have to worry about water seeping in. Just pitch it and go … or, more appropriately, stay.

The Mountain Ultra 3 is a great choice for car camping or short backpacking trips. But if you’re looking to go ultralight, you might want to consider something else.

Important Features of the Best Backpacking Tent for Tall People

An ant can carry up to 50 times its body weight. Why?

Because they’re so tiny, ants’ muscles have a greater cross-sectional area relative to the size of their bodies. Thus, they can generate more force milligram-for-milligram than say …

… a 6-foot-4-inch human that is more than 1,700 times bigger.

Therefore, the bigger you are, the more energy it takes to carry a burden, like a backpack full of gear, over any given distance.

So, tall-camping backpackers get a bum deal … especially when it comes to finding ultralight tents that provide plenty of space while sparing our gravity-ridden frames unnecessary drag.

The struggle is real; but, here are some key factors to consider when walking that fine line.

1. Backpacking Tent Frame Type

What holds your tent up significantly affects its weight: an internal hub-pole frame (freestanding) or dual-purposed trekking poles (non-freestanding).

Freestanding tents (like the Dagger OSMO or REI Half Dome) have an internal frame that is usually made of aluminum or some other (relatively) lightweight metal alloy.

The benefit is that these tents typically provide more headroom throughout due to their domed shape and tend to be more stable when pitched.

However, the tradeoff comes when you have to pack those poles and lug their substantial weight down the trail.

Non-freestanding tents (ZPacks Duplex or Six Moons Lunar) don’t have an internal frame and, instead, use your trekking poles to support the canopy.

This design is much lighter on your back, but they tend to limit headroom to a central peak or ridgeline and can be less resilient in heavy weather.

So, pick your poison: More internal space and rigidity at the cost of more weight? Or less head space and more flap in your walls for increased pep in your step on the trails?

2. Construction Materials (Fabric, Poles, and Stakes)

The best backpacking tents for tall people are typically made with lightweight, yet durable, materials to reduce weight without sacrificing strength or weather resistance.

Canopy, Floor, and Fly Fabrics

Tent fabrics are usually some combination of nylon and/or polyester that is treated with a waterproof/water-resistant coating (like silicone or polyurethane).

The lightest backpacking tents (ultralights) are typically constructed of Dyneema or silicone-impregnated nylon (sil-nylon). You’ll find these materials in the most expensive tents.

Lower cost, heavier backpacking tents are typically constructed of nylon, polyester oxford, and taffeta: practical in their own right, just not as lightweight.

Some tent makers, like Big Agnes, use a proprietary material and are stingy with the details.

This area is froth with highly technical, and, as manufacturers like it, an enigmatic maze of super-fluid terminology and tossed-around specifics that, in my experience, are meant to befuddle even the most-researched of us.

When in doubt, go for the best balance in price, size, and weight backed by a respectable smattering of experienced backpacker feedback (like mine … pardon my boast).

Poles and Stakes

The most common pole materials are aluminum (light but not as strong as some other metals), carbon fiber (strong and light but expensive), or a composite material like Easton Syclone (strong, light, and relatively affordable).

Some of the best backpacking tents people use a single pole while others have multiple poles. The number of poles typically corresponds with the amount of interior space (more poles = more space).

Stakes are usually made of aluminum, titanium, or some other light weight metal. The best stakes are simply those strong enough to hold up your tent in strong winds but light enough that you won’t mind carrying them.

So, in effect, a cheap set of 1/4″ aluminum dowel rods from your local hardware store cut to an 8″ length will do just fine …

That’s a backpack hack, y’all.

3. Weatherproofing

A completely enclosed tent shell (TETON Mountain Ultra) requires more material (thus, more ounces) than a floating canopy (ZPacks).

Your decision ultimately hinges on the climate you do most of your camping in: cold and wet climates will necessitate a fully-enclosed shell while warmer, drier climates can get away with a structure that is more open to the air.

Unless you plan on camping in the burning desert. That’s a different ball of wax … gritty wax.

4. Interior Space

Here lies the rub for tall folk.

The best backpacking tents for tall people provide plenty of interior space to store gear and move around without feeling claustrophobic or having to constantly duck your head.

Unfortunately, more internal space typically means more fabric and, sometimes, more poles … and more weight.

So, what’s a gangly hiker to do?

In order to get the most space and shed the most ounces, select a non-freestanding tent that makes use of your trekking poles for support.

Or, to go even lighter (as light as you can without resorting to sleeping shelter-less), consider learning how to make your own tarp-shelter from no more than an ultralight tarpaulin, paracord guylines, and a few aluminum stakes.

This is not only an extremely effective way to shave ounces, but it also gives you that rough-n-tough sense of outdoor independence.

Like Bear Grylls, but real.

5. Vestibule Area and Storage Pockets

Thanks to our tech-and-lip-balm-centric culture, we are inevitably burdened with pocket-sized gadgets and do-dads that make for lumpy companions when we try to sleep in our hiking britches.

So, we need extra space to store them. Hence, gear pockets, lofts, and vestibules (screen room) in otherwise lighter tents.

The best backpacking tents for a tall person, therefore, MUST have plenty of gear pockets and/or lofts to store all your gadgets, gizmos, and doo-hickeys.

Some also have attached vestibules where you can stash your muddy shoes or keep your pack dry during a storm. The best vestibules are large enough to comfortably store your gear but not so large that they add unnecessary ounces.

6. Capacity

Here, capacity refers to the number of humanoids a tent can sleep comfortably (or snuggly as the trend goes).

We are OutdoorFamily HQ; thus, we aim to recommend products that cater to your entire crew of minions (AKA: tents that can squeeze in more than one).

Still, the conundrum remains: should you buy one tent in which to cram all of you, or …

… buy several allowing you to divvy up the weight on the trail and, at night, sleep more comfortably.

Me? I don’t like putting all my eggs into one basket. I prefer to have several tents in case one goes on the fritz (which will happen), and …

… after a few days on the trail, the other eggs in my family start to emit a funk.

Space, please.

7. Is a Footprint (Groundsheet) Needed?

Why, you ask, would a self-respecting tent-making company craft a tent with a floor that is too wimpy to be a floor, thus requiring an additional fabric tent-diaper to protect it from the bare earth it was designed to be pitched upon?

Answer: $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Did you need to ask?

Nonetheless, here’s some advice: if the tent you have fallen in love with does not come with a tent footprint or groundsheet, then, yes, shell out for the one they offer or an after-market that fits the dimensions of your tent floor, or …

… go construction dumpster diving.

You know that Tyvek material that’s used to insulate houses?

That stuff is actually used by high-end tent manufacturers to make their groundsheets and there are plenty of scraps of the stuff casually disposed of in residential construction sites.

Oh, and, we don’t actually recommend this as it presents a life-threatening hazard and, in some cases, may be illegal. I heard that somewhere.

Be Freegan, my friend.

Be Tall, Be Wild, Be Happy

Just because you’re a human Sasquatch does not mean you have to suffer the indignity of low ceilings, bent knees, and soggy gear.

There are plenty of great backpacking tents for tall people available on the market.

Just make sure you do your research and find the right tent that fits your needs in terms of weight, durability, space, capacity, and price.

And, if you happen to be on the shorter side, don’t worry, we have you covered too. Just check out our post on the best backpacking tents for short people.

If we ever write one. ‘Cause, to be honest, all tents work for short people. So, why write one?

Now, get out there.

Joshua Davis

Being outdoors is freedom! Being outdoors with my wife and two boys is LIVING! Whether in my backyard or getting lost in a National Park, there’s nothing I’d rather do than explore, discover, and experience the paradise that surrounds us. Give me my family, a backpack, and a trail and my life is full!